Current Lab Members

 Brunet Lab. (2015-2016) (minus Patrick House and Johanne Brunet)

group

from left to right: Danny Minahan,  Marisa Brudny, Erika Shaffer, Rosy Link, Kyle Krellwitz, Emmanuel Santa-Martinez, Cibele de Castro and Austin Bauer

Graduate Students and visiting Scholar (2015-2016)

grad_cibele_2015-2016_opt

from left to right: Danny Minahan, Emmanuel Santa-Martinez, Rosy Link, Cibele de Castro and Austin Bauer

Current Graduate Students

Emmanuel Santa-Martínez

PhD Candidate in Entomology
June 2012 – present

B.S. University of Puerto Rico-Humacao, Biology

LabPhoto_Emma_Santa_optI grew up in San Lorenzo, Puerto Rico, and received a B.S. degree in Biology from the University of Puerto Rico-Humacao (UPR-Humacao). As an undergraduate student, I participated in several summer internships. I conducted research at the University of Colorado-Boulder, the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Case Western Reserve University and UPR-Humacao. In 2012, I began graduate studies in the Department of Entomology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where I’m pursuing my PhD. My research project involves examining the foraging behavior of honey bees, bumble bees, and alfalfa leafcutting bees on alfalfa plants and quantifying their impact on selfing rate and the potential for gene flow. I’m studying how distinct bee species forage within and among plants and deposit pollen over successive flowers. My research will help others understand how distinct pollinators mediate mating systems and impact the genetic structure of plant populations. I’m actively involved in outreach events where I teach the community about pollinators, their importance and benefits, and ways to promote their conservation. I’m also the Extension student from the Entomological Graduate Student Association from our department. Aside from research I like going to the beach, gardening, movies, and hiking.

Website:   https://www.linkedin.com/in/emmanuelsanta

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Emmanuel_Santa-Martinez

Publications:

Mohl, E. K., Santa-Martinez, E., & Heimpel, G. E. (2016). Interspecific differences in milkweeds alter predator density and the strength of trophic cascades. Arthropod-Plant Interactions, 1–13.

Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11829-016-9430-3/fulltext.html

Riday, H., Reisen, P., Raasch, J. A., Santa-Martinez, E., & Brunet, J. (2015). Selfing Rate in an Alfalfa Seed Production Field Pollinated with Leafcutter Bees. Crop Science, 55(3), 1087-1095

Awards: 

Academic Year 2015-2016

1) USDA- AFRI Student Travel Grant- ESA 2015 in Minneapolis, MN

2) Kinney Merit Award – Department of Entomology, UW- Madison

Academic Year 2016 – 2017

1) ICE 2016 – NSF Travel Award, ICE 2016 in Orlando, FL  (announcement was in March 2016) 

Presentations:

Santa, E., Brunet, J. Linking pollinator behavior to selfing rate for three distinct pollinators of alfalfa. Oral Presentation. Wisconsin Ecology 19th Annual Spring Symposium, University of Wisconsin-Madison. March 2016.

Santa, E., Clayton, M., Brunet, J. Comparing the behavior of three bee species foraging on alfalfa flowers. Poster Presentation. Wisconsin Ecology Recruitment Session, University of Wisconsin- Madison. February 2016.

Santa, E., Brunet, J. Linking pollinator behavior to selfing rate for three distinct pollinators of alfalfa. Oral Presentation. Entomological Society of America meeting, Minneapolis, MN. November 2015.

Santa-Martinez, E., Brunet, J. Linking pollinator behavior to selfing rate for two distinct pollinators. Poster Presentation. Wisconsin Ecology Recruitment Session, University of Wisconsin-Madison. February 2015.

Santa-Martinez, E., Brunet, J. Linking pollinator behavior to selfing rate for two distinct pollinators. Poster Presentation. Entomological Society of America national meeting, Portland, OR. November 2014.

Santa-Martinez, E., Brunet, J. Linking pollinator behavior to selfing rate for three distinct pollinators of alfalfa. Oral Presentation. North-Central Branch meeting Entomological Society of America, Des Moines, IA. March 2014.

Affiliations:

Entomological Society of America

Ecological Society of America

Society for the Study of Evolution

American Association for the Advancement of Science

Danny Minahan

PhD Candidate in Zoology
Fall 2013 – present

Danny’s Personal Website

  • B. A. (Magna cum Laude) University of Colorado at Boulder – Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Danny Lab Picture_opt

My research interests are focused on the foraging behavior of bees, and how this relates to the identity and quality of collected resources. I use a variety of approaches to address these questions including radio frequency identification (RFID) to monitor bee movement to and from the hive, and collecting resources directly from returning foragers.

Aside from academia I also enjoy skiing, rock climbing, paddling, natural history strolls, guitar, and pleasure reading (generally non-fiction; history, current events, and philosophy).

Awards:

The Garden Club of America Centennial Pollinator Fellowship. March 2016.

University of Wisconsin – John Jefferson Davis Travel Award. December 2015

University of Wisconsin – Department of Zoology Graduate Research Grant. May 2014

Presentations:

Minahan, D., Brunet, J. Comparing the Temporal Foraging Patterns of the European Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) and Common Eastern Bumble Bee (Bombus impatiens). Poster presentation. Entomological Society of America meeting, Minneapolis, MN. November 2015.

Affiliations:

Entomological Society of America

Ecological Society of America

Society for the Study of Evolution

 Rosabeth Link

Graduate Student – Master in Entomology
2014 – present

rosypic_opt_editedI am a Master student in the Brunet lab, interested in insect- plant interactions – specifically pollination. I have a B.S. in Biology from Dickinson College. I study the floral scent of alfalfa flowers, and how bees of three species (leaf-cutting bees, honey bees and bumble bees) respond to the chemical components making up the scent. I will identify the volatile compounds from several varieties of alfalfa, and study bee reaction to individual chemicals using electroantennogram trials and choice tests. I love working with bees and I am very excited to be a part of the lab.

Publications

Brunet, J., M.W. Thairu, J.M. Henss, R.I Link and J.A. Kluever. 2015. The effects of flower, floral display and reward sizes on bumble bee foraging when pollen is the reward and plants are dichogamous. Int. J. Plant Sci. 176(9): 811-819.
 
Carr, David E., et al. “Variation in reward quality and pollinator attraction: The consumer does not always get it right.” AoB Plants (2015): plv034.

 

Honorary Fellow

Josh Coon

Undergraduate Students

  • Marisa Brudny  Biology 152 and Entomology 299;  Spring 2016 (University Research Scholar)
  • Alayna Hoesly   (Biology 152 and Entomology 299)
  • Dale McKittrick  (Entomology 299)
  • Gabrielle Stamas (University Research Scholar)
  • Cecilia Grinis  (University Research Scholar)

Former Graduate Students

Margaret W. Thairu

Graduate Student – Master in Entomology
2011 – 2014

  • B.S. Florida State University, Biological Sciences

Margaret completed her Master Thesis in Entomology in Spring 2014 and is now pursuing a PhD in the department of Entomology at the University of Illinois.Margaret’s project examined the role of bumble bee and hawkmoths in maintaining color variation in populations of the Rocky Mountain Columbine, Aquilegia coerulea.

Publications from the Lab

Margaret Thairu and Johanne Brunet. 2015. The role of pollinators in maintaining variation in flower colour in the Rocky Mountain columbine, Aquilegia coerulea. Annals of Botany  115:971-979. 

Brunet, J., M.W. Thairu, J.M. Henss, R.I Link and J.A. Kluever. 2015. The effects of flower, floral display and reward sizes on bumble bee foraging when pollen is the reward and plants are dichogamous. Int. J. Plant Sci. 176(9): 811-819.

Posters and Presentations

Thairu M. W., and J. Brunet 2013. Pollinator preferences and their potential effects on floral trait diversity. Entomological Society of America, Austin, TX, November 10-13.

Johanne Brunet, Yang Zhao, Megan Van Etten, Margaret Thairu, Vera Pfeiffer, Jillian Henss and Murray Clatyon. 2013. Modeling pollinator movements to predict transgene escape in insect-pollinated crops. Entomological Society of America, Austin, TX, November 10-13.

Thairu M. W., and Brunet Johanne, (2012) Presentation: Pollinator preference and their potential role in maintaining floral trait diversity. Presented at the Entomological Society of America annual meeting, Knoxville Tennessee.

Austin Bauer

Graduate Student – Master in Entomology 2014 – 2016  

Austin defended his Master thesis in June 2016. He is currently an assistant coach for tracks and field at Luther College.

website photo austin_optMy primary research interests are in plant-pollinator interactions.  My research focuses on how variation in floral traits of alfalfa influences foraging behavior in three distinct bee species: honey bees (Apis mellifera), bumble bees (Bombus impatiens), and alfalfa leaf cutting bees (Megachile rotundata).  I work in patches of flowering alfalfa at an agricultural field station examining which floral traits are most attractive to these bees and how those plant traits influence bee movement.

I graduated from Luther College (’14) with a B.A. in Biology. My undergraduate research examined the effect of prescribed fire on plant and insect (ground beetles and butterflies) communities in a roadside prairie planting in northeast Iowa with Dr. Kirk Larsen. Prescribed fire was used as a control method for invasive cool-season grasses that currently dominate roadsides and to stimulate growth of native plants.  The goal of the project was to create a native diverse mesic tallgrass prairie suitable for native insect species.

http://ilr.winningit.com/ResearchProjects/90-00-LRTF-309Larsen.pdf

Outside of academia, I enjoy hiking/backpacking, canoeing, cooking, and watching sports.  I also run on the Movin’ Shoes Race Team in Madison, WI, I play trumpet in the University Band and I play French horn in a brass quintet at Midvale Community Lutheran Church.

Publications from the Lab

Bauer AA, MK Clayton and J Brunet. Floral traits influencing plant attractiveness to three bee species and its consequences for plant reproductive success. Submitted.

Bauer AA and J Brunet. (in preparation)  Phenotypic selection by three distinct pollinators.

 

Department of Entomology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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