Selective Logging causes long-term changes to forest structure

Original Story by Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com (February 18, 2015)

Logging in Gabon.

Recent research has showed the ecological changes of selective logging in African tropical forests.  The paper goes over the idea that the practice of selective logging contributes to the growth of weeds and vines reducing plant diversity and diminishing carbon storage. 

Rainforest in Gabon.

Data was collected on more than 500 plots in Sierra Leone, Ghana, Cameroon, and Gabon that compared several traits across selectively-logged, and secondary forests.  The findings showed that even low-intensity logging causes sustained ecological changes to African forests.  Check out the article below for more info and let us know what you think.

CITATION: Roberto Cazzolla Gatti, Simona Castaldi, Jeremy A. Lindsell, David A. Coomes, Marco Marchetti, Mauro Maesano, Arianna Di Paola, Francesco Paparella, Riccardo Valentini. The impact of selective logging and clearcutting on forest structure, tree diversity and above-ground biomass of African tropical forests. Ecological Research January 2015, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 119-132 

 

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