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Pollinators

Many fruit crops depend on pollinators for proper reproduction and fruit set. Pollinators are comprised of many orders of insects beyond bees and include butterflies, moths, beetles, and other insects. We focus on obtaining a better understanding of pollinators, primarily in cranberry systems. This research based data is used to facilitate growers understanding and to assist in proper management that supports more effective pollination and higher fruit yields.


 

FUTURE RESEARCH (2018+):
strawberry pollinator_opt

Our future research will focus on native pollinators in cranberry.  We will be determining the effects of pollinator gardens on native pollinator populations by performing pollinator assessments.  We will also be looking at the impacts of pollinator gardens on cranberry yield.  Stay tuned for updates!

 

 


 

SUPPLEMENTAL SUGAR FEEDING STUDY

In 2016 and 2017, we assessed the impact of supplemental sugar feeding on honeybee fidelity to cranberry in commercial settings.  More specifically, we sought to investigate which commonly utilized source of supplemental sugar feeding may lead to an increase in honey bee visitation to cranberry flowers which are poor in nectar content.  This information can be vital to growers which spend approximately $140 to $210 per acre on rented hives.  The results of this study are still being analyzed and will be released soon!


 FUNGICIDE STUDY

In 2016 and 2017, we also assessed the effect of fish fertilizer and fungicides commonly used on cranberry marshes during bloom on the foraging behavior of honeybees.  We worked in over 17 marshes to see whether the percentage of cranberry pollen brought back to the hive changes after an application.   The results of this study will be released soon!

 


 

LANDSCAPE COMPOSITION AND HIVE PLACEMENT STUDY

In 2015, we determined the fidelity of honeybees to cranberry by assessing the effect hive placement and landscape variance on the vicinity of a marsh have on pollinator efficiency of the desired crop (cranberry).  You can read a synopsis of what we discovered here.


THE GUEDOT RESEARCH TEAM is always buzzed about working with pollinators.  Honey bee hives are infinitely complex and beautiful to watch in action, and wearing a bee suit is always a silly experience.   Here are two of us doing our very own bee dance-


WILDLIFE AND VIEWS IN THE FIELD

The team always sees quite a bit more than just insects when it goes out to pollinator study sites.

From mammals- to reptiles- to birds, working out in mother nature is always an adventure, and the views aren’t bad either!