Lesson plan index

The lessons will be presented in a suggested timeline format. The classroom is a dynamic place. We understand that there are time constraints and daily schedule fluctuations in every classroom, but it is important to note that there are a few lessons that are time sensitive. These lessons are marked with an asterisk (*) You may skip these, but they won’t work nearly as well if they are moved to a different time frame. Otherwise feel free to modify lessons as your classroom requires.

Lessons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21
Bonus Lessons: 1-You Are What you Eat, 2-Dining Out with Manduca, 3-Microhike, 4-Survival Hunt, 5-Vincent Vanduca, 6-World’s Strongest

Lesson 1: I wonder what a scientific journal is and how it works…
The students will create their own scientific journals. Students at any age can learn the importance of keeping clear records and pictures of their observations, of recording information and observations for later use. Future lessons, daily observations, and results from activities can all be kept together within this journal. Teachers can direct their students to look for specific changes or details and can focus on writing skills. Go to lesson 1.

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Lesson 2: I wonder what an important observation is…
This lesson will help students realize the importance of descriptions and details in writing. Teachers can use this lesson to set a standard by which journal sheets/observation notebooks will be evaluated throughout the project. Go to lesson 2.

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Lesson 3: I wonder what this egg is going to be…
This lesson has two parts. First, students will attempt to answer questions posed by the teacher about Manduca’s name and it’s meaning for the insect, and also compare the actual insects before them to their initial predictions when they were just little greenish eggs.

Secondly, they will formulate a way to determine how many insects would fit on a penny. This inquiry is being done in order to help students gain a concept of the insect’s size in the initial stages, so that they will have a better understanding of how much the insect actually grows over the 2 month period of the project. Size will help students understand to outward characteristics of gluttony. Go to lesson 3.

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Lesson 4: I wonder what that thing on my Manduca is…
Using the anatomy diagrams located under the Anatomy section of the All About Manduca tab, students will become more familiar with technical terms for Manduca anatomy. After making their own predictions and observations, the teacher will review the  terms with the class. Students will then complete a crossword puzzle in order to gain experience and familiarity with Manduca vocabulary terms. This familiarity, with encouragement from their teacher, will translate into more specific and scientifically-based daily observations. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 5: I wonder how fast Manduca grows…
After teacher modeling, students will create a bar graph representing growth in both length and width of their Manduca since it hatched. Students will use their data to make predictions about Manduca growth over the next few days and up until the time of pupation. The initial activity can be done in one class period, but looking into students predictions will necessitate a daily record of length and width, space on their bar graph, and in-class time to add onto their charts (weekly or bi-weekly basis). A sample of a completed growth chart can be found under the All About Manduca tab. This chart will help the teacher guide student questions. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 6: I wonder what would happen if lots of Manduca had to live in a small space…
Students will look at insect crowding, making predictions, and observations as they watch for specific behaviors. The following is a great experiment that deals with issues of crowding and fighting that takes place during the early stages of Manduca‘s life. These experiments or extensions should be run in the classroom over the next few days. Manduca only exhibit this fighting behavior during a small window in their life cycle, therefore timing is important for this inquiry. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 7: I wonder why there is so much frass…
Students will make their daily observations, add to their growth charts, and then try to speculate as to what frass is. They will attempt to support these answers with speculations, observations and thoughts. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 8: I wonder where the Manduca came from…
The arrival of Manduca in this country will be looked at and students will examine the economic and physical means that brought it into this country. They will also make their daily observations and learn the definition of frass. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 9: I wonder what camouflage is…
Students will make their daily observations and then look at the way that Manduca, other animals, and humans use camouflage. This exploration of camouflage is facilitated by a teacher directed camouflage experiment and the creation of a camouflage collage. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 10: I wonder what Manduca needs to survive…
The students will look at Manduca and think of materials and conditions that it needs to survive. They will draw parallels between human needs and those of other creatures and examine some of the strengths and weaknesses of both. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 11: I wonder if Manduca sees like me…
Students will learn about how Manduca see. They will then write a brief story from the perspective of an insect. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 12: I wonder what a pest is…
Students will take a look at what animals are considered pests and why. Put the honeybee insect on trial. Students will be presented with the argument that honeybees are pests and we should get rid of them! Students will argue for keeping honeybees by listing their good qualities and contributions or argue to make honeybees extinct. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 13: I wonder what the Manduca life cycle looks like…
Students will create their own insect model and explain its life cycle. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 14: I wonder how fast Manduca grows compared to me…
Students will attempt a measurement data collection similar to the penny exercise, in order to compare and contrast their data. Using their observation journals, students will look back on the growth rate of their Manduca by looking at the classroom Manduca growth graph, the website growth chart, or their own data. They will then look for patterns in growth rate. Then students will compare their own growth rate to Manduca‘s to determine which grows faster, human or Manduca. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 15: I wonder how Manduca breathe...
Teacher will place a Manduca in water for the class to see and speculate how the Manduca breathes. They will then look for differences and similarities between the way humans breathe. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 16: I wonder how the Manduca life cycle compares to the human life cycle…
This lesson looks at life cycles. Students will construct their own versions of the human life cycle and place themselves at some point along it. They will provide explanations for the cycle they create and the point they place themselves on it. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 17: I wonder what the phrase global society means…
Students will learn the definition of a “global society”. They will take this knowledge and speculate about the positive and negative ramifications of living in a global society. Primary inquiry method will be a survey of where our goods (clothing, school/household items, cars, food…) are made. Incorporated into this lesson can be a simple discussion of invasive species – where do they come from and why or how did they get here. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 18: I wonder what Malaria is…
The students will look more closely at the concept of a global society. Students will be given a mini history lesson about malaria which is spread by mosquitos. They will use their new knowledge to explain how diseases are able to travel around the world. Students will also compare how diseases spread in the early 1900’s compared to how they are spread today and why that is dangerous. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 19: I wonder what other diseases insects spread…
Students will investigate a disease that is spread by insects from a list that the teacher provides. Students will create a brochure using information they find while researching the disease, the insect, the countries where the disease is common, and the cures or vaccines. Students will present their brochures with their classmates, and are encouraged to take them home and share with friends and family. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 20: I wonder if that plant likes Manduca hanging out on its leaves…
Students will look at the relationship between plants and Manduca. They will also look at human interactions with the plant world. After examining the world, take an observation walk at a local park or on school grounds, have them develop that they can make the area a better or more productive place. Go to lesson.

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Lesson 21: I wonder…
Students will take what they have observed, what they have learned, and what they still have questions about, and create their own experiments and inquiries. Go to lesson.

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Bonus lessons

Bonus Lesson 1: Dining out
Students will gather fresh leaves from the school grounds or from home and see if Manduca prefers their leaves to that of a tomato plant. The teacher will need to purchase or have access to a tomato plant for this lesson. Because of the need for a tomato plant, this lesson will need to be done during spring. Go to lesson.

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Bonus Lesson 2: Are you what you eat?
Students and/or teachers will add food coloring to Manduca diet. The food coloring will effect Manduca‘s pigment. Teacher can use the image of the Manduca found in nature and the Manduca raised in the laboratory or classroom to help students see the contrast before beginning the experiment.
**This experiment must be carried out prior to the wandering stage. Go to lesson.

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Bonus Lesson 3: Vincent VanDuca
Students will spread gel style food coloring onto Manduca legs and let them walk across white or colored paper. Students will get a better look at Manduca footprints and movement style. They will use rulers to measure and compare Manduca stride and body segments. Plus it makes for great wall art!

There are enough ideas for experiments to last multiple days, depending on how in depth you would like to get with your students.

IMPORTANT!! This experiment must be done at the wandering stage. Go to lesson.

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Bonus Lesson 4: World’s strongest Manduca
Students will test their Manduca’s speed and strength. This experiment must be done during the fifth instar when the insect is actively looking for a pupal site. Students place a light, small plastic container (like a storage container or butter dish) over a their Manduca, and add pennies to the top of the container to test how strong their Manduca are.
** Manduca are most active during wandering stage. Go to lesson.

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Bonus Lesson 5: Survival hunt
Students will search the school grounds/designated area for pieces of yarn (insects). The yarn will be brown, dark green, light green, and red or another bright, flashy color. Students will observe after their bug hunt which color bugs were found most frequently and discuss why they think that happened. Go to lesson.

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Bonus Lesson 6: MicroHike
Students will go out in pairs and report how many insects they can find in a teacher designated outdoor space. The students, with the help of their teacher will compare this number to the number of students in a school building. Which will be more crowded? Go to lesson.

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