Chloe Wardropper

Chloe Wardropper, PhD Candidate, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, wardropper@wisc.edu, CV_27Jan2017

2015-08-10 16.37.50

About me: My research interests include, 1) the use of scientific information by natural resource managers; 2) the role of federalism in the implementation of US water and other natural resource policies; 3) market-led conservation; and 4) planning and adaptation for changing weather conditions.

At UW-Madison, I’ve contributed to the interdisciplinary Water Sustainability and Climate Project, part of North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research. I am currently supported by the Novel Ecosystems IGERT.

Before coming to UW, I worked on public land acquisitions with the U.S. Department of Justice, assisted in soil and wetland conservation with the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service in Massachusetts, and implemented environmental practices with a U.S. Agency for International Development agriculture project in West Africa. I hold a B.A. from Wesleyan University’s College of Social Studies.

Campus Affiliations: Water Sustainability and Climate ProjectNovel Ecosystems IGERTHoltz Center for Science and Technology StudiesCenter for Culture, History, and Environment; Lakeshore Nature Preserve

Publications:

Qiu, J., B. Wardropper, A.R. Rissman, M.G. Turner. Spatial fit between water quality policies and hydrologic ecosystem services in an urbanizing agricultural landscape. Accepted, Landscape Ecology. doi:10.1007/s10980-016-0428-0.

Wardropper, C.B., S. Gillon, E. McKinney, S. Carpenter, A. R. Rissman. Local perspectives and global archetypes in scenario development. Ecology and Society, 21(2), 12.

Wardropper, C.B., C. Chang and A.R. Rissman. (2015). Fragmented water quality governance: Constraints to spatial targeting for nutrient reduction in a Midwestern USA watershed. Landscape and Urban Planning, 137, 65-75.

Carpenter, S.R., E. Booth, S. Gillon, C. Kuckarik, S. Loheide, M. Motew, J. Qiu, A. R. Rissman, C.B. Wardropper, J. Seifert, A. Mase, E. Soylu, M. G. Turner. (2015). Changing Drivers and Plausible Futures of a Social-Ecological System: Yahara Watershed, Wisconsin, USA. Ecology and Society, 20(2), 10.

Outreach and education:

Blogging at Yahara in situ and Edge Effects

Teaching module on future thinking

Citizen stream monitor, Rock River Coalition

Twitter @cbwardropper

 

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