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Spotted Wing Drosophila in Wisconsin

Welcome to the Wisconsin Spotted Wing Drosophila in Wisconsin information page. This site provides an overview of Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) biology, impacts, and management in the state. Additional content and Extension materials will be added as they become available.

SWD on Raspberry
 SWD adult on raspberry
  Hannah Burrack, NC State University, Bugwood.org
Infested Grape
 SWD larvae on grape
  Phil Pellitteri, UW-Madison Insect Diagnostic Lab
Damaged Raspberries
 Raspberries destroyed by SWD larvae
  Phil Pellitteri, UW-Madison Insect Diagnostic Lab
SWD Male
 Adult male SWD
  Sheila Fitzpatrick, Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Agassiz, BC
SWD Female
 Adult female SWD
  Sheila Fitzpatrick, Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Agassiz, BC
Ovipositor
 Serrated Ovipositor of SWD Female
  Hannah Burrack, NC State University, Bugwood.org
Size vs Penny
 SWD adults compared to a penny
  Phil Pellitteri, UW-Madison Insect Diagnostic Lab
SWD Trap
 Apple cider vinegar trap for monitoring SWD
  Hannah Burrack, NC State University, Bugwood.org

Spotted Wing Drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, is a small fly that can cause significant damage to a number of fruit crops in Wisconsin, including: raspberries, blackberries, grapes, cherries, blueberries, and others. This exotic pest is related to vinegar flies (commonly called “fruit flies” when found around the house). SWD is native to parts of eastern Asia and was found In California in 2008. Shortly thereafter, SWD was found in the Pacific Northwest and Florida (2009). SWD was discovered in Wisconsin in the fall of 2010. Over 35 states now have SWD infestations. Currently, the majority or known infestations occur along the east and west coasts and in the midwest states. In 2012, 11 Wisconsin counties had confirmed SWD infestations, and infestations were suspected in another 7 counties.